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Posted by on Dec 24, 2012 in Law | 1 comment

1.9. Alimony Not An Outright Result Of Divorce

Divorce cases, in the most ideal of situations, would take only a few weeks or a few months to finish, that is, if the spouses agree to settle the issue fast and make the matter less stressful and expensive. Otherwise, it may drag on for about a year, but less than two, if both parties will refuse to resolve the issue and all other concerns connected to it. The longer a divorce case takes, the more stressful and demoralizing it becomes, especially for the defendant, more correctly called respondent – the party from whom answer/action to a divorce petition is required. No matter how long a divorce case takes, though, the proceedings almost always entail emotional and devastating effects. To help you go through all the details of the case, as well as to inform and update you on all the things you need to know and probably ought to anticipate as the case progresses, is your divorce lawyer an individual highly trained in the field of family law, under which divorce and other domestic concerns fall, and can competently represent you, defend your rights and fight for your best interests.

Highly aware of the complexity, importance, and sensitivity of legal family matters, divorce lawyers learn how and when to apply their deep knowledge of family and divorce law from the start to the end of the case, providing support for the client if and when necessary. That is why, besides divorce, they are also trained on many other areas which involve issues on adoption, domestic violence, custody of child, child support, division of property, paternity actions, child visitation and alimony or spousal support, a monthly monetary provision or support for the divorced spouse (may be wife or husband) who is not self-sufficient, as ordered by a court. Not all divorce cases entail alimony, though. In short marriages or those where the difference in the amount of salary received by both spouses is not substantial, alimony is rarely granted. The opposite of these two instances, though, usually merit its awarding.

1 Comment

  1. This was a good article. It contained some useful information that I wasn’t aware of.

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